• Home
  • Conference Program

Conference Program




  Mon - Apr 19      Tue - Apr 20      Wed - Apr 21      Thu - Apr 22      Fri - Apr 23      Sat - Apr 24   

MONDAY, APRIL 19

10:00 - 12:00 PM
LECTURE
WELCOME & KEYNOTE LECTURE
Chair/Organizer: Max Fletcher


10:00

WELCOME BY ACHEMS 2021 PRESIDENT
Linda Barlow. University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus


10:15

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS
Max Fletcher. The University of Tennessee Health Science Center


10:30

AWARDS CEREMONY
Nirupa Chaudhari. University of Miami


11:00

KEYNOTE: MOUSE FACIAL EXPRESSIONS REFLECT EMOTIONS AND REVEAL SUBJECTIVE VALUE
Nadine Gogolla. Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology


11:45

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS.

12:00 - 1:00 PM
ANCILLARY MEETING
GRADUATE STUDENTS AND POSTDOC MEMBER MEET & GREET (GRADUATE STUDENTS AND POSTDOCS ONLY)
Chair/Organizer: Jess Kanwal, Kellie Hyde

Graduate Students and Postdocs Only Please. We invite you to join us for a meet-and-greet event with other graduate students and postdoc members of AChemS. We hope that this event will be an opportunity for you to meet and network with other early career scientists in the chemical senses. Further, Kellie Hyde, Jess Kanwal and Kara Fulton, as graduate student and postdoc representatives in attendance, will communicate any suggestions you have to improve the involvement of graduate students and postdocs in the society to the AChemS Executive Committee.


1:00 - 3:00 PM
SYMPOSIUM
CELL TYPES IN TASTE BUDS AND TENTACLES
Chair/Organizer: Thomas Finger, Sue Kinnamon

This symposium will discuss the current thinking about the diversity of cells within taste buds and octopus suckers. While octopus suckers may seem an odd juxtaposition, (why not drosophila?), both taste buds and sucker taste receptor cells share the property of being specialized epithelial cells rather than being neurons as in arthropod taste organs. Both suckers and taste buds share the property of possessing different morphological types of receptor cells that correlate with functional properties. Vertebrate taste buds are classically described as possessing 3 types of elongate taste cells yet recent studies suggest additional cell types exist and raise the question of how to define cell types in any chemoreceptor system.



1:00

CELL TYPES IN TASTE BUDS AND TENTACLES
Thomas Finger, Sue Kinnamon. Rocky Mtn. Taste & Smell Ctr. / U. Colo Med Sch, Aurora, CO, USA


1:10

CANNONICAL CELL TYPES IN MOUSE TASTE BUDS
Courtney E Wilson1, 2, 3. 1University of Colorado School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology, Aurora, CO, USA. 2University of Colorado School of Medicine Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Aurora, CO, USA. 3Rocky Mountain Taste and Smell Center, Aurora, CO, USA


1:35

SALT-RESPONSIVE CELLS - A UNIQUE CELL TYPE?
Akiyuki Taruno1, 2. 1Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, *, Japan. 2JST PRESTO, Saitama, *, Japan


2:00

NON-CANONICAL CELL TYPES IN TASTE BUDS
Kathryn Medler. University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA


2:25

MOLECULAR BASIS OF CHEMOTACTILE SENSATION IN OCTOPUS
Lena van Giesen, Peter Killian, Corey Allard, Nicholas Bellono. Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA


SATIETY-BASED MODULATION OF CHEMOSENSORY PROCESSING ACROSS ORGANISMS
Chair/Organizer: Thorsten Kahnt, Laura Shanahan

It is well-appreciated that chemosensory perception and feeding behaviors are modulated by satiety, metabolic state, and body weight via central and peripheral brain mechanisms. The goal of this symposium is to bring together researchers who are seeking to understand these complex interactions at complementary levels through their groundbreaking work in organisms ranging from invertebrates to primates. Dennis Mathew will present data on how anorectic peptides modulate the function of olfactory neurons across satiety states in Drosophila larvae, and how dysregulation of peripheral mechanisms influences feeding behavior and animal physiology. Matthew Gardner will present data on how satiety-related changes in choice behavior depend on baseline preferences in rats, and the role of orbitofrontal cortex in mediating this relationship. Maia Pujara will discuss findings on how interactions between orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala bias behavior when food palatability changes in nonhuman primates. Finally, Laura Shanahan will present work on how satiety influences perceptual decision-making and neural responses to food odors in human olfactory cortices. Together, these speakers will provide an overview of recent research on how satiety impacts chemosensory behavior in different species and the neural mechanisms driving satiety-dependent changes. By exploring this topic from a cross-species perspective, the symposium will highlight parallels in chemosensory processing across organisms, from simple to complex. Delving into the fascinating relationship between satiety and chemosensation is critical and timely given the profound impacts of the chemical senses on food intake and obesity.



1:00

SATIETY-BASED MODULATION OF CHEMOSENSORY PROCESSING ACROSS ORGANISMS
Thorsten Kahnt, Laura Shanahan. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA


1:20

ANALYSIS OF STARVATION-DEPENDENT MODULATION OF OLFACTION USING THE DROSOPHILA LARVA.
Eryn Slankster1, Roshni Jain2, Dominique Baria1, Brianna Dailey-Krempel1, Seth Odell3, Dennis Mathew1, 2, 3. 1Department of Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, USA. 2Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, USA. 3Integrated Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, USA


1:45

SHIFTS IN FOOD PREFERENCE FOLLOWING SELECTIVE PRE-FEEDING DEPEND ON AN INTACT ORBITOFRONTAL CORTEX
Matthew PH Gardner1, 2, Jessica C Conroy1, Davied Sanchez1, Jingfeng Zhou1, Geoffrey Schoenbaum1, 3, 4. 1NIDA Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, MD, USA. 2Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada. 3Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. 4Departments of Anatomy & Neurobiology and Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA


2:10

A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF FLAVOR-NUTRIENT CONDITIONING ON DECISION-MAKING AND AUTONOMIC AROUSAL IN RHESUS MACAQUES
Maia Pujara1, 2, Jaewon Hwang1, Nicole Ciesinski1, 3, Charday Long1, Dawn Lundgren1, Elisabeth Murray1. 1National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. 2Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, NY, USA. 3Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA


2:35

HOW SATIETY MODULATES PERCEPTUAL DECISION-MAKING IN OLFACTORY CIRCUITS
Laura K Shanahan1, Surabhi Bhutani1, 2, Thorsten Kahnt1. 1Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. 2San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA

4:00 - 6:00 PM
SYMPOSIUM
PRESIDENTIAL SYMPOSIUM
Chair/Organizer: Linda Barlow


4:00

CHEMOSENSORY BEHAVIORS OF SKIN-PENETRATING NEMATODES
Elissa Hallem. University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA


4:40

NEURAL CONTROL OF FORAGING AND FOOD INTAKE
Nilay Yapici. Cornell University


5:20

SUGAR: A GUT CHOICE
Diego/V Bohórquez. Duke University, Durham, NC, USA

6:00 - 8:00 PM
SYMPOSIUM
MAX MOZELL: THE WORK LIVES ON
Chair/Organizer: Theresa White

Max Mozell, one of AChemS’ founders, passed away in March of 2020. Max's life in research was dominated by the study of olfactory perception and the effects of its loss on the patients with olfactory loss that he saw at the Smell and Taste Disorders Clinic at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. This symposium is meant to honor his contributions to chemosensory research by looking at the latest developments in our understanding of the events in the nasal cavity. One of the things that Max would often say is that although many mysteries remain in understanding olfactory perception, at least one aspect is clear: if molecules from odorous substances can’t reach the olfactory receptors, there can be no perception. The airflow to deliver the molecules and the way that the molecules interact with the nasal mucosa are therefore central to the olfactory perceptual process. Changes in either the number of molecules or their distribution (and sorption) on the mucosa then alters incoming olfactory information, possibly resulting in dysosmia. This symposium will focus on recent findings in the peripheral olfactory system involving sniffing behavior, odor sorption, and molecular biology, as well as their application to clinical chemosensory disorders.



MAX MOZELL: THE WORK LIVES ON
Theresa White1, 2. 1Le Moyne College, Syracuse, NY, USA. 2Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA


THE SNIFFING BRAIN: FROM A UNIT OF OLFACTION TO A UNIT OF COGNITION
Noam Sobel. Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Neurobiology, Rehovot, *, Israel


MOZELL'S CHROMATOGRAPHIC THEORY: A MOLECULAR BASIS OF COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR?
Ann-Sophie Barwich. Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN, USA


ADDRESSING SMELL LOSS: FROM A CLINICAL OLFACTORY RESEARCH CENTER TO ONGOING TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH EFFORTS
Bradley J. Goldstein. Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA


LORD ADRIAN'S AND MAX MOZELL'S ANALOGY: OLFACTION AS A SPATIAL SENSE.
David M Coppola. Randolph Macon College, Ashland, VA, USA


NON-WEIRD HUMAN CHEMOSENSORY SCIENCE
Chair/Organizer: Maria Velduizen, Valentina Parma

As chemosensory scientists, we are called to uncover and solve as a community open problems related to the chemical senses. Such problem-solving is inextricably intertwined with the societies we live in, and the chemical senses may be the senses that are most acutely affected by culture, environment, social race and geography. As a result, chemosensory knowledge is biased towards Western, educated, industrialized, rich and democratic (WEIRD) populations and research areas. It is a missed opportunity to not conduct more inclusive and collaborative research to solve complex chemosensory problems which often progress thanks to diverse perspectives, and the accumulation of big-data. In this symposium we propose themes in the literature, methodologies and approaches that provide advancements in chemosensory science that can be widely and cross-culturally applicable. How can we use olfactory testing flexibly, for example for screening during a pandemic? How does culture shape odor awareness and, more in general our (chemo)sensory perception? How can we link basic scientific chemosensory discoveries to the lived experience of patients, in ways that makes patients feel heard and reinforces confidence in science?



NON-WEIRD HUMAN CHEMOSENSORY SCIENCE
Maria G Veldhuizen1, Valentina Parma2. 1Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin University, Mersin, *, Turkey. 2Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA


LOCAL AND GLOBAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE ANTHROPOCENE ON OLFACTION
KC Hoover. University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA


(THIS IS THE TITLE OF MY ABSTRACT) OLFACTORY TESTING IN A NON-WEIRD POPULATION IN AFRICA REQUIRES NEW NORMS, CULTURALLY APPROPRIATE ODORS AND CONSIDERATION OF ENDEMIC PATHOLOGIES
Patrick Balungwe Birindwa1, 2, Caroline Huart2, Ghislain Bisimwa1, Richard Matanda3, André Mouraux2, Philippe Rombaux2. 1Université Catholique de Bukavu, BUKAVU, *, Congo-Kinshasa. 2Université Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles, *, Belgium. 3Université de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, *, Congo-Kinshasa


MOVING FROM RESEARCHER-CENTRIC METHODOLOGIES TO PATIENT-INCLUSIVE CHEMOSENSORY RESEARCH
Duika Burges Watson. Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, UK


GLOBAL COMMONALITIES IN SOCIAL ODOR AWARENESS FROM A LARGE-SCALE DATASET: STUDY ACROSS 44 COUNTRIES
Agnieszka Sorokowska1, Cross-Cultural Research Group 2. 1Institute of Psychology, University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, *, Poland. 2Universities Worldwide, World, *, Poland

6:00 - 8:00 PM
POSTER SESSIONS
POSTER SESSION #1


DO FATS AND CARBOHYDRATES IN THE DIET MODULATE PERIPHERAL OLFACTION?
Dolly Al Koborssy, Federica Genovese, Hillary Ellis, Michael Tordoff, Johannes Reisert. Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA


VOLATILE-ENHANCED-SALTINESS: A SIMPLE METHOD TO IDENTIFY ACTIVE VOLATILES
Linda M. Bartoshuk1, Thomas A. Colquhoun1, Asli Odabasi1, Charles A. Sims1, Derek J. Snyder1, Kevin Xu2. 1University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. 2Ernst & Young. LLP, New York, NY, USA


EFFECTS OF DIETARY FAT INTAKE ON FATTY ACID SIGNALING IN MOUSE TASTE CELLS
Ashley N. Calder1, 2, Naima S. Dahir1, 2, Yan Liu2, Timothy A. Gilbertson2. 1Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA. 2Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA


OLFACTORY SENSITIVITY AND FOOD NEOPHOBIA: A PSYCHOPHYSICAL STUDY AMONG OLDER CHILDREN
Dominika Chabin1, Maciej Karwowski1, Thomas Hummel2, Agnieszka Sorokowska1. 1Institute of Psychology, University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, *, Poland. 2Arbeitsbereich Riechen und Schmecken, Klinik und Poliklinik fur Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, TU Dresden, Dresden, *, Germany


PLASTICITY OF RETRONASAL ODOR PERCEPTION IN YOUNG CHILDREN
Sarah E. Colbert, Joost X. Maier. Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA


CHANGES IN SPLICING AND NEUROMODULATORY GENE EXPRESSION PROGRAMS IN SENSORY NEURONS WITH PHEROMONE SIGNALING AND SOCIAL EXPERIENCE
Bryson Deanahrdt1, Chengcheng Du1, Qichen Duan1, Charles soeder2, Corbin Jones2, Pelin Volkan1. 1Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. 2University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA


THE RECOVERY OF NEURAL TASTE RESPONSES FOLLOWING AXOTOMY IS DEPENDENT ON IL-1 RECEPTOR SIGNALING
Guangkuo Dong, Schuyler Kogan, Natasha Venugopal, Eddy Chang, Lianying He, Daniel Linder, Lynnette P McCluskey. Medical College of Georgia at AU, Augusta, GA, USA


DECIPHERING THE CELL SURFACE CODES UNDERLYING THE ASSEMBLY OF DROSOPHILA OLFACTORY CIRCUITS
Qichen Duan1, Scott Barish1, Khanh Vien1, Pelin Volkan2. 1Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. 2Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Durham, NC, USA


THE FUNCTION OF EGR4 IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE PERIPHERAL GUSTATORY SYSTEM
Debarghya Dutta Banik, Brian A. Pierchala. Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology & Physiology, Stark Neurosciences Research Institute, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA


IDENTIFICATION OF NEW INTERMEDIATE TASTE CELL POPULATIONS SUGGESTS A ROLE FOR NOTCH SIGNALING IN TASTE CELL FATE DECISIONS IN MOUSE CIRCUMVALLATE PAPILLA TASTE BUDS
Dany Gaillard1, Eric D. Larson2, Lauren A. Shechtman1, Trevor Isner1, 3, Theresa M. Keeley4, Austin E. Gillen5, Peter J. Dempsey6, Linda C. Samuelson4, Linda A. Barlow1. 1Department of Cell & Developmental Biology, and the Rocky Mountain Taste & Smell Center, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. 2Department of Otolaryngology, and the Rocky Mountain Taste & Smell Center, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. 3Cell Biology, Stem Cells and Development graduate program, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. 4Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. 5RNA Bioscience Initiative Bioinformatics Fellows, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. 6Section of Developmental Biology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA


ALK3-MEDIATED BMP SIGNALING REGULATES MESENCHYMAL-EPITHELIAL INTERACTIONS TO PROMOTE TASTE PAPILLA DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SECRETORY FACTORS.
Mohamed Ishan1, 2, Zhonghou Wang1, 2, Yuji Mishina 3, Hong-Xiang Liu 1, 2. 1Regenerative Bioscience Center, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. 2Department of Animal and Dairy Science, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. 3Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA


PROBING RODENT BEHAVIORS THROUGH RESPIRATION PATTERNS
Emma Janke, Andrew H. Moberly, Mary Schreck, Wenqin Luo, Long Ding, Minghong Ma. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA


ROLE OF NOTCH SIGNALING IN THE APICAL VS BASAL NEURONAL CELL FATE DETERMINATION IN THE VOMERONASAL ORGAN.
Raghu Ram Katreddi, Ed Zandro M Taroc, Jennifer M Lin, Paolo E Forni. University at Albany, Albany, NY, USA


MODULATION OF OLFACTORY OUTPUT NEURONS AFFECTS WHOLE-BODY METABOLISM
Louis J Kolling1, Roberta Tatti2, Debra A Fadool1, 2, 3. 1The Molecular Biophysics Program, The Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA. 2Progam in Neuroscience, The Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA. 3Department of Biological Science, The Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA


ROLE OF THE GUT MICROBIOME IN DIETARY OLFACTORY LOSS
Ashley M. Loeven1, Brandon M. Chelette2, Debra A. Fadool1, 2, 3. 1Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA. 2Program in Neuroscience, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA. 3The Molecular Biophysics Program, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA


REPORTS OF TASTE, SMELL, AND SLEEP QUALITY IN INDIVIDUALS WITH ALCOHOL USE DISORDER DURING COVID-19
Christian/Z. McDuffie1, Khushbu Agarwal1, Melanie Schwandt1, Nancy Diazgranados1, Vijay/A. Ramchandani1, Paule/V. Joseph1, 2. 1National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Bethesda, MD, USA. 2National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), Bethesda, MD, USA


HSV-1 INFECTION IN THE OLFACTORY EPITHELIUM AND SPREAD IN THE BRAIN.
Laetitia Merle1, 2, Christy S. Niemeyer3, B. Dnate Baxter Bolt1, 2, Arianna Gentile Polese1, 2, James Hassell Jr. 3, Andrew N. Bubak3, Maria A. Nagel3, Diego Restrepo1, 2. 1Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. 2Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. 3Department of Neurology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA


CHRONIC, TREATMENT-REFRACTORY NASAL OBSTRUCTION WITHOUT OBVIOUS ANATOMICAL DEFORMITY: IT MAY BE A TRIGEMINAL PROBLEM
Chloé Migneault-Bouchard1, Franciscus Johannes Maria Boselie2, Marianne Hugentobler2, Basile Nicolas Landis2, Johannes Frasnelli1, 3. 1Department of Anatomy, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (UQTR), Trois-Rivières, QC, Canada. 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Geneva University Hospitals (HUG), Geneva, *, Switzerland. 3Research Center of the Sacré-Coeur Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada


COADAPTATION OF THE CHEMOSENSORY SYSTEM WITH VOLUNTARY EXERCISE BEHAVIOR IN MICE
Quynh Anh T. Nguyen1, David Hillis2, Sayako Katada3, Timothy Harris2, Crystal Pontrello4, Theodore Garland, Jr. 1, 2, 5, Sachiko Haga-Yamanaka1, 2, 4. 1UCR Neuroscience Program, Riverside, CA, USA. 2UCR Graduate Program in Genetics, Genomics & Bioinformatics, Riverside, CA, USA. 3Kyushu University Department of Stem Cell Biology and Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka, *, Japan. 4UCR Department of Molecular, Cell, and Systems Biology, Riverside, CA, USA. 5UCR Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, Riverside, CA, USA


LONG-TERM EATING BEHAVIOR IN METABOLIC SURGERY
Jessica G. Nicanor Carreon1, M. Belen Acevedo2, Jennifer Zeng2, Blair Rowitz1, 3, 4, M. Yanina Pepino2. 1Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA. 2Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA. 3Carle Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana, IL, USA. 4Department of Surgery, Carle Foundation Hospital, Urbana, IL, USA


OLFACTORY-TRIGEMINAL MASKING EFFECTS
Iryna Ruda1, Franziska Sonja Müschenich3, Jessica Freiherr1, 2. 1Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, *, Germany. 2Sensory Analytics, Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV, Freising, *, Germany. 3Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, *, Germany


GLI3 IS A MODIFIER OF SOX10 IN OLFACTORY ENSHEATHING CELL FORMATION.
Ed Zandro M. Taroc, Paolo E. Forni. University at Albany, Albany, NY, USA


EVC2 IS AN ESSENTIAL REGULATOR FOR TASTE PAPILLA AND TASTE BUD FORMATION
Zhonghou Wang1, 2, Honghao Zhang3, Yuji Mishina3, Hong-Xiang Liu1, 2. 1Regenerative Bioscience Center, Athens, GA, USA. 2Department of Animal and Dairy Science, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. 3Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences & Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA


HATCHLING EARTHWORMS, EISENIA HORTENSIS, AVOID ALLYL ISOTHIOCYANATE (AITC) AT LOWER CONCENTRATIONS THAN ADOLESCENTS OR ADULTS
Hannah G. Watson, Leonardo Silenzi, Andrew T. Ashchi, Colleen Riley, Izzy Nelson, Glenn S. Marrs, Wayne L. Silver, Cecil J. Saunders. Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA


AN INVESTIGATION INTO PLUME-GUIDED ODOR SEARCH BY OCTOPUSES
Willem L Weertman1, 4, David Scheel1, Venkatesh Gopal2, David H Gire3, 4. 1Alaska Pacific University, Anchorage, AK, USA. 2Elmhurst University, Elmhurst, IL, USA. 3University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. 4Friday Harbor Laboratories, Friday Harbor, WA, USA


GLI2 AND GLI3 REGULATE HORIZONTAL BASAL CELL MEDIATED REGENERATION OF THE OLFACTORY EPITHELIUM
Anna Shirazyan1, Ariell M. Joiner1, Justine Ra1, Melissa S. Kim1, Jeffrey R. Martenz4, Andrzej A. Dlugosz2, Charlotte M. Mistretta3, Benjamin L. Allen1. 1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. 2Department of Dermatology, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. 3Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences & Prosthodontics, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. 4Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Gainesville, FL, USA

8:00 - 9:00 PM
ANCILLARY MEETING
VIRTUAL BOATHOUSE