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Conference Program


Welcome! Please find the current preliminary program for AChemS 2019 listed below. Note that any aspect of this program is subject to change.

April 13-14: AChemS Pre-Meeting Program
April 14-17: AChemS Annual Meeting Program


  Mon - Aug 3rd      Tue - Aug 4th      Wed - Aug 5th      Thu - Aug 6th      Fri - Aug 7th   

TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2020

10:00 - 12:00 PM

SYMPOSIUM

EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR CHEMOSENSORY RESEARCH (LIVE ONLY - NOT RECORDED)
Chair(s): Dmitry Rinberg
Parallel Room 1

“The progress in science depends on new techniques, new discoveries and new ideas, probably in that order” – Sydney Brenner

The last decade of the brain research is distinguished by an unprecedented development of novel technologies. Almost all fields of neuroscience have experienced revolutionary transformation. Modern genetic approaches are used to identify the cell types with a single cell precision, and to map connections between distant parts of the brain. Developing optical and electrophysiological methods allows for simultaneous monitoring and manipulation of large number of cells. Machine learning significantly contributed to the mining of animal behavior. These technologies are penetrating chemosensory research and becoming our daily toolkit for solving specific problems. The symposium brings together a few leading scientists who push the boundaries of these emerging technologies and apply them to studies of chemical senses.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author.



SEMIOCHEMICALS AND YOUR SOCIAL LIFE: MOLECULES, RECEPTORS, AND CIRCUITS UNDERLYING CHEMOSENSORY BEHAVIOR (LIVE ONLY - NOT RECORDED)
Chair(s): Markus Rothermel, Julian Meeks
Parallel Room 2

Social behaviors are a fascinating model to delineate the links between genes, neural circuits and complex natural behaviors. They are evolutionary conserved and prevalent across mammalian and non-mammalian species: social behaviors among conspecifics are exhibited by virtually all animal species and are essential for survival, and reproduction. Impairment in social function is a prominent feature of several neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. In mice, olfactory cues such as e. g. pheromones have been shown to elicit social behaviors in addition to non-olfactory cues and intrinsic states. How the brain organizes and integrates these extrinsic and intrinsic information to enable social behaviors is currently a major topic in neurobiology. Work from many labs has demonstrated that the activity of olfactory as well as central circuits are important for different forms of social behaviors. This symposium will highlight recent developments on the elucidation of neural circuits driving animal social behaviors from different perspectives: e. g. at the level of the olfactory organs, and centrally in converging nuclei of the hypothalamus and amygdala.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author.



THE BRIDGE BETWEEN TASTE AND SMELL, AND ALL THAT JAZZ
Chair(s): Monica Dus
Parallel Room 3

No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author.


2:00 - 4:00 PM

SYMPOSIUM

ACHEMS PRESIDENTIAL SYMPOSIUM: CENTRAL CIRCUITS UNDERLYING CHEMOSENSORY-DRIVEN BEHAVIOR
Chair(s): Matt Wachowiak
Parallel Room 1

This symposium highlights new work examining neural circuit mechanisms underlying sensation and learning in olfaction and taste.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author.



OLFACTORY GENE EXPRESSION AND REGULATION (LIVE ONLY - NOT RECORDED)
Chair(s): Scott McGrane, Julie Mennella
Parallel Room 2

Sponsored In Part By: Mars, Inc.

The perception of volatile chemicals, critical for flavour and the modulation of a variety of behaviours, is mediated by an array of olfactory receptor genes which constitute by far the largest multigene family in mammals. This symposium focuses on a variety of research approaches that further our understanding of the diversification of the olfactory system required to decipher such complex odor cues and highlights variation among species - a reflection of the environment in which the species live and the consequence of frequent gene gains and losses during evolution.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author.



HOW ODORANT METABOLIZING ENZYMES SHAPE ODOR PERCEPTION
Chair(s): Jean-Marie Heydel, Andrea Buettner
Parallel Room 3

Lingering in the background of every odorant-receptor interaction is an odor metabolizing enzyme. Over the last several years, a fascinating set of studies in rodents, rabbits, insects and humans has demonstrated thatthese enzymes participate in the active biotransformation of odorous molecules within the perireceptor environment. These mechanisms may exert two unique effects: first, to maintain odor sensitivity by reducing receptor saturation, and second, to transform the local milieu of the odor components giving rise to unique odor percepts. This symposium will focus on the impact of odorant metabolizing enzymes on functional and behavioral aspects of olfactory perceptual processing.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author.


5:00 - 7:00 PM

ANCILLARY MEETING

COMMUNICATING DURING COVID: HOW TO PUT YOUR BEST DIGITAL SELF FORWARD WHILE NETWORKING, JOB HUNTING, AND FIGHTING FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE.
Ancillary Room 1

This mentoring and networking event aims to provide a set of virtual communication skills to aid science progress during the era of COVID. Relax and enjoy a seminar followed by discussions with your colleagues.



No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author.